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Tax Planning for Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrency Profits

Image of a variety of cryptocurrency coins laying on one another.Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and other cryptocurrencies have seen dramatic price increases this year. Have you thought about cashing in? Are you wondering how will you be taxed?

Cryptocurrency is a Capital Asset

The IRS has clearly stated that cryptocurrency (aka virtual currency) is a capital asset like property. And therefore, the buying and selling of it for profit results in short-term capital gain if held for under one year, and long-term capital gain if held for over a year. Short-term capital gain rates are based on your regular income tax bracket, while the long-term capital gains rate is 15-20%, depending on income level. IRS Notice 2014-21.

So, for example, let’s say I bought 10 Bitcoin in June 2017 for $25,000 US dollars when the price of Bitcoin was approximately $2,500. I decide that in December 2017 that I would like to sell my Bitcoin. The price is now approximately $16,500 per Bitcoin, so my holdings are now worth $165,000. As a result, my $25,000 investment has generated a taxable profit of $140,000. Since I owned the Bitcoin for less than one year, the income will be short-term capital gain income and I will pay at my regular federal rate.

If I instead held the cryptocurrency until July 2018, then I would have long-term capital gain and would be paying tax at a much lesser rate.

Any realized gain from the cryptocurrency profit is taxable. This is the case if you exchanged Bitcoin for other cryptocurrency, or for goods or services. In this instance, you take the value of the Bitcoin in US dollars at the time of the exchange for other property and treat whatever gain you have when that Bitcoin was exchanged (at the value of the other property) as your taxable gain. Let’s say you bought 10 Bitcoin in 2015 for $250 per Bitcoin for a total purchase price of $2,500. You decide to exchange one Bitcoin, valued at $16,500 in December 2017, for 17 Ethereum valued at approximately $500 per Ethereum. Your gain on the Bitcoin being exchanged is the value of the Ethereum, $16,500, minus the cost of the Bitcoin, $250, for a long-term capital gain of $16,250.

Mining Cryptocurrency

Cryptocurrency mining is the process of using servers and other computers to verify the blockchain and transactions that are the backbone of the cryptocurrency. This IRS has stated that income from cryptocurrency mining, whether received in dollars or cryptocurrency, is taxable as regular income. Consequently, if you have engaged in the cryptocurrency mining business or are otherwise self-employed doing cryptocurrency mining then the income you received is taxable at your ordinary income rates and it will also be subject to self-employment tax.

Retirement Accounts and Cryptocurrency

Retirement accounts such as IRAs and 401(k) can own Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency. This requires a self-directed IRA or 401(k) and some careful structuring. For a more detailed discussion on this topic, check out my prior article and video here. When gains are made from the sale of cryptocurrency, whether for US dollars or other cryptocurrency, there is no tax owed on the gain. And, if you use a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k), there will be zero tax owed when you pull the funds out at retirement. For traditional IRAs and 401(k)s you pay tax when you withdraw the funds at retirement and these distributions, as is the case for all traditional IRA or 401(k) distributions, are subject to tax at your ordinary income tax rate at the time of distribution.

If your self-directed IRA or 401(k) is invested into cryptocurrency mining, as opposed to holding cryptocurrency for investment, then the income from such mining activities will likely cause unrelated business income tax.

Can Your SDIRA Own Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies?

 

Yes, your IRA can invest in and own bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin is a form of virtual currency using blockchain technology, and can be exchanged between parties for goods and services, or for dollars. From 2011 to July 2017, the value of Bitcoin has risen from $0.30 per Bitcoin to $2,550 per Bitcoin. As a result, we’ve seen a significant increase in the number of questions from investors whether their retirement account can invest in and own actual Bitcoin or other forms of cryptocurrency.

Can Your IRA Own Bitcoin?

Well, the short answer is: “Yes, your IRA can own Bitcoin and other forms of cryptocurrencies, such as Ethereum and Litecoin.” The only items an IRA cannot invest in is life insurance, S-Corp stock, and collectibles as mentioned in IRC 408(m), which refers to tangible personal property such as “art, rugs, coins, etc.” and “any other tangible personal property the Secretary determines.” Bitcoin is certainly an intangible item by all accounts and would not be considered tangible. As a result, an IRA can own Bitcoin or other cryptocurrency since such investments are not restricted.

How Are Bitcoin Gains Taxed?

The IRS issued IRS Notice 2014-21 addressing the taxation of Bitcoin and cryptocurrency, and stated that Bitcoin and other forms of virtual currency are property. The sale of property by an IRA is generally treated as capital gain, so the buying and selling of cryptocurrency for investment purposes wouldn’t trigger unrelated business income tax (UBIT) or other adverse tax consequences that can occasionally arise in an IRA.

How Do I Own Bitcoin with My SDIRA?

There are three steps to own Bitcoin or other cryptocurrency with your IRA:

1. First, you will need a self-directed IRA with a custodian who allows for alternative assets, such as LLCs.

2. Second, you will invest funds from the IRA into the LLC. Your IRA will own an LLC 100%, and that LLC will have a business checking account. For more details on IRA/LLCs, please check out my prior video here.

3. And third, the IRA/LLC will use its LLC business checking account to establish a wallet to invest and own Bitcoin through the wallet. The most widely used Bitcoin wallet is through a company called Coinbase, and you can use your wallet on Coinbase to buy, sell and digitally store your cryptocurrency.

There are already certain publicly-traded funds and other avenues (e.g. Bitcoin Investments Trust) where you can own shares of a fund that in turn owns Bitcoin. But, if you want to own Bitcoin directly with your IRA, you’d need to follow the steps outlined above. Keep in mind, Bitcoin and other forms of cryptocurrency have significant potential in the digital age. However, as with any new market investment, make sure you proceed with caution, and don’t “bet the farm” or “go all in” on just one investment or deal.