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Contract Hand-offs

From my article on Realtor Magazine

Investors eyeing foreclosures and other residential properties to flip often connect with other investors looking for opportunities in the single-family rental market. Contract assignments are a common tool in these kinds of transactions because they enable investors to get a property under contract quickly and, rather than assume the risk that comes with turning it into a long-term investment, turn it over to an end buyer before closing in exchange for a fee. Read the article at Realtor Magazine here.

SEC Expands Accredited Investor Rule

From my article on Entrepreneur

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has announced a modernized version of the accredited-investor rule that will goes into effect in late October and will allow those with professional credentials and licenses to qualify as accredited investors to invest in startups, pre-IPO stock, venture companies and funds and other private funds. This amendment widens the spectrum of eligible investors who can invest their personal funds or retirement accounts into certain investments or company stock offerings that are routinely limited by law to accredited investors. Read the article on Entrepreneur here.

Legally Raising Money for Others

If you are receiving a fee for assisting someone else’s company in raising money, then you must operate within the confines of securities laws. These laws provide three different ways in which one may legally raise money for another company for a fee. You can’t get a “commission” or “bonus” or anything of value for bringing an investor to another company or person unless you fit into one of these three categories:

Broker Dealer License

First, if you are licensed and are registered with an SEC registered broker dealer, you may receive commissions and other forms of compensation for raising money in public or private offerings (e.g. private placements).  The newest form of registration from FINRA is designed to license and regulate those who operate as “investment bankers,” called a “Series 79 license.” This license allows a holder to collect commissions and other fees for raising funds for an offering of equity (e.g. stock) or debt (e.g. notes or bonds). In addition to passing the licensing test, you’ll need to associate with a broker dealer.

Finder’s Fee

Second, if you take a limited role in the raising of funds and are paid a flat or hourly fee, as opposed to commissions based on funds raised, you may be able to be paid a finder’s fee for introducing investors to others. A finder’s fee can only be paid to a finder so long as:

  1. The finder isn’t involved in negotiations of the securities being sold.
  2. The finder doesn’t discuss the details of the securities.
  3. The finder isn’t paid based on money raised (e.g. no commission).
  4. The finder doesn’t perform “finding” services on a regular basis.

In sum, a finder’s fee may be paid but only to someone who makes introductions of potential investors, and the fee amount must be based on some factor other than compensation relating the persons or amount of securities sold to those introduced by the finder.

Director or Officer of Offering Company

Third, you may be able to assist in raising funds for another if you are an Officer or Director of the company whom you are raising money for. The SEC promulgated Rule 3a4-1 which is a Safe Harbor from enforcement and allows someone who serves as a paid Director or Officer to assist in selling the company’s securities. There are many ways to qualify under this Rule but the most common is to meet the following criteria:

  1. Be paid as a Director or Officer by salary or other criteria that is not linked to sales of securities made (e.g. be the CFO or Treasurer and offer financial consulting advice in addition to working with potential investors).
  2. Can’t be associated with a Broker Dealer and cannot have a prior SEC disciplinary history.
  3. Should stay on with the company following closing of the offering so as to show your purpose as a Director or Officer was not just for raising funds.
  4. Takes a passive and restrictive role in selling the securities and refers to the CEO or President for details and negotiations.

Failure to comply with the securities laws can result in civil and criminal action. In addition, investors who can claim a failure to comply with the laws outlined above are able to rescind their investment and can subject the company’s founders and the person soliciting the investment with personal liability for any losses.

Quitclaim Deed Versus Warranty Deed, What to Use?

Image of a miniature house sitting on a Deed with the text "Quitlcaim Deed Versus Warranty Deed: What to Use."When it comes to transferring property, such as rental properties into LLCs or your personal residence into a Trust, it can be confusing understanding whether you should use a quitclaim deed or a warranty deed. Here is a brief description of each type of deed and when they should be used.

Warranty Deed – A warranty deed transfers ownership and explicitly promises the buyer that the transferor has clear title to the property, meaning it is free of liens or claims of ownership. The terms of a warranty deed should state that the transferor “warrants” and conveys the property.  The warranty deed may make other promises as well, to address particular problems with the transaction. But generally, the use of the word “warrant” means that seller/transferor guarantees the new owner as to clear title. Because the seller “warrants” clear title under a warranty deed, it is a preferred method of title transfer and should be used by real estate investors and property owners as the default method of transferring title. When transferring title from your own name to your LLC or Trust, the use of a warranty deed typically allows the title insurance you bought when you acquired the property to remain in effect.

Quitclaim Deed – A quitclaim deed transfers whatever ownership interest a person has in a property. It makes no guarantees about the extent of the person’s interest. If you are buying a property from a third-party, you would never want to use a quitclaim deed because they aren’t making any guarantee as to whether they own it or not, or if they have clear title. It would be like paying someone on the street for a set of keys to a car. Who knows whether they own the car or not? You gave them money for it, and if they do own it, you just bought it. But, if they don’t own it, then you’re out of luck and you’ll have to resolve the ownership issue with the person who legally owns it. There are limited situations where a quitclaim deed is used. In some instances, a quitclaim deed is used when the buyer and seller are aware of legal issues or defects to title, so the seller transfers their interest and the new buyer has to resolve the title issues. Another situation, perhaps more common, arises in states that have a transfer tax. For example, some states will exempt transfer taxes on the transfer of title from the owner to their own LLC, but only if it is by quitclaim deed (e.g. Tennessee). When transferring title to your own LLC, we generally aren’t worried about title issues, so the savings on transfer taxes make the quitclaim deed a better option.

Most states don’t have a transfer tax, but to make matters more complicated, some states use the term “grant deed”, California being one of the most prominent. The reality is that a grant deed can be used as a quitclaim deed OR a warranty deed. It essentially depends on the verbiage used inside the terms of the deed itself. If you see words like “warrant” and “convey,” then you probably have a warranty deed. Bottom line: Make sure that you look at the language used in the deed itself. Don’t think that because you have a grant deed you have all of the benefits of a warranty deed.

Our Recommendation – Always double check the local state and county laws regarding the type of deed to use when transferring property, and what the different types of deeds actually provide. HOWEVER, as a general rule of thumb, we recommend the warranty deed when transferring property to yourself, your trust, or your own company because we want to make sure that the Title Policy and all of its benefits transfer to the Grantee of your deed.

Alert: The RISE Act Will Drastically Impact Self-Directed IRAs

The Retirement Improvements and Savings Enhancements Act (“RISE Act“) has drastic changes and provisions that effect self-directed IRA investors. From mandatory third-party valuations on all retirement account investment transactions to changing the 50% disqualified company rule to 10%, the bill has some significant changes that will negatively affect your ability to self-direct your account. There are some favorable provisions for IRA owners, however, the negatives greatly outweigh the positives.

 

Most Important Provisions

The bill sponsor is Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) who is the Ranking Member of the Senate Finance Committee and the Joint Committee on Taxation. Here’s a quick run-down of the most troublesome provisions that apply to self-directed IRA investors:

  • Valuation Purchase/Sale Requirement. Mandatory Valuation Requirement for Private IRA (non-public stock market) Transactions: The new proposal seeks to require gifting valuation rules and standards for IRA transactions. This rule will force IRA owners to get a valuation before making any private investment. This valuation would include real estate, private company (e.g. LLC, LP, corporation), and note investments. The gifting valuation rules were created to value gifts where no value is set between a buyer and seller. mandating those same rules on actual transactions between an IRA and another unrelated party is unrealistic and unnecessary to establish actual fair market value.
  • 50% Rule is Reduced to a New 10% Rule: Changes the 50% rule that states a company is a disqualified person to an IRA when it is owned 50% or more by disqualified persons (e.g. IRA owner and certain family). The new rule makes a company disqualified when owned 10% or more by disqualified persons.
  • Roth IRAs Capped at $5M: Roth IRAs will be capped at $5M. Any amount over $5M must be distributed from the Roth IRA.
  • Eliminate Roth Conversions: Traditional IRA funds cannot be converted to Roth IRA funds. Roth IRAs will be allowed only if the account owner makes initial Roth IRA contributions and only when they meet the Roth IRA contribution limits, which restricts high-income earners.
  • Require RMD for Roth IRAs: Roth IRAs are currently not subject to required minimum distribution (“RMD”) rules because the amounts distributed do not result in tax. This rule will change and RMD will apply to Roth IRAs when the account holder reaches age 70 ½.

These proposals will have drastic impacts on self-directed IRA investors. The valuation requirement is perhaps the most dramatic as it will require valuations before an IRA can buy an asset and before it can sell an asset. Not only will this cause administrative issues and increased costs, but it will undoubtedly replace the ability of an IRA buyer or an IRA seller from transacting their IRA at the price and value they determine to represent the actual current fair market value of their investments.

I have written a detailed analysis of the bill which I plan to share with the Senate Finance Committee and the Joint Committee on Taxation. I welcome your input as a self-directed IRA investor and plan to advocate for common-sense rules that help self-directed investors take control of their retirement. My draft bill analysis can be accessed at the link below. Please send your comments to [email protected]

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